A good thing happens in Philippines

A good thing happens in Philippines

Dmitry Kosyrev

A good thing happened in the distant Philippines. The point is not that a pro-Russian candidate won the presidential election, but that a clearly pro-American candidate lost. As for the positions of the two main competitors in the current fierce election battle, the winner, Ferdinand Marcos, is a supporter of a balanced and generally friendly policy towards China, and only in this sense is he indirectly “ours”. But the human rights activist Leni Robredo, who lost to him, is to such an extent an “American girl” that she could drag her country into any kind of alliance with the United States and thereby change the balance of power in the whole region.
However, foreign policy did not appear in the campaign at all. There was something more important – and also of global significance. Before us is a unique case when a person is actually made president only because of his name – more precisely, the name of his father, also Ferdinand Mar-cos, President of the Philip-pines from 1965 to 1986.
It has long been noted that the current, younger, 64-year-old Marcos is not the best speaker in the world and his rallies were not exactly spectacular. True, his team competently built a campaign based on social networks.
But Leni Robredo was a firework of pre-election technologies with the construction of many networked volunteer organizations and hundreds of thousands of people taking to the streets. The latest American classic – and yet the country as a whole did not support Leni.
The political biography of Ferdinand II is not grandiose: well, he was a senator. He charmed the co-untry with beautiful promises? No. The electoral platforms of the two candidates do not differ much: both stood for all that is good. This is generally very Filipino when parties and movements are built not around some distinct ideology, but around personalities, around the style of their behavior. Then the corresponding parties merge, spill over, disappear – based on the political zigzags of their leaders.
In general, the matter, we repeat, is almost only in the name of his father. And here the most interesting begins. If you glance at any Western media, at least this one, then you read a sadly standard verdict: President Ferdinand Marcos was a corrupt dictator, who also ruled through martial law and destroyed his opponents, he is guilty of total corruption, plundered the country and plunged it into a total crisis, after which in 1986 he was overthrown by an indignant people, who wrote the brightest page in the book of Philippine history with this rebellion.
This ideology has been instilled in the Filipinos themselves since that very bright 1986, almost from kindergarten. However, as you gradually become part of Filipino society, you will be surprised to find that more and more people whisper confidentially to you: that was the golden age. If the country lived well and achieved something worthy, then it was just under Marcos and thanks to Marcos.
Apparently, one after another, generations of people, observing something that they did not like in their own country, muttered under their breath: “Marcos is not on you.” And now it happened: “Philippines went crazy” and elected a second Marcos – in order to restore justice.
And this, if we are talking not about the Philippine, but about the world history of our day, is a grandiose event of global significance, which cannot but rejoice us in Russia.
Let’s see what happened: the people of a fairly large country, in spite of a long and massive pressure on the brains, threw out the remnants of the ideology of color revolutions. Moreover, this ideology burst where it began.
Experts say that there were rehearsals somewhere in Latin America, but in general, the first powerful and effective color revolution was the very same 1986 and the same Philippines. By the way, they are called colored because the revolutionaries use some color to mobilize their ranks and visual effects in mass actions. In the Philippines it was yellow.
In that year, the main avenues of the capital became yellow, on which hundreds of thousands of demonstrators came out, declaring that the presidential elections that had just passed had been stolen from the people. And very few then whispered that, in fact, the country once again voted for Marcos, and for the most part the capital rebelled: a typical technology of all subsequent revolutions. But what do you say against this yellow river? By the way, now Leni Robredo tried to use color technology again, only her color was pink. But the country again voted for Marcos.
In the same place, in the Philippines, and then, in 1986, an ideologeme called “bloody dictator” was developed. Dozens of such people later appeared in the world, but it was Marcos who was appointed to the role of the first in time. Today, in a normal country and a normal society, all this already causes laughter: he clings to power for too long, he is out of his mind and isolated from the country by a close circle of villains, he crushes opponents… But the main and obligatory thing is that he steals. It was there and then that the idea was born about the “capitalism of friends” robbing the country, but the dictator himself had to carry billions of money for himself personally. Well, the bright and beautiful United States and today lead the crusade against corrupt officials (foreign, of course).
Economists have long figured out that the financial crisis that the Philippines fell into in 1985-1986 was not Marcos’s fault, but came from outside, because of the financial situation. But one way or another, the ten billion dollar public debt was then a disaster – and that was the amount of the stolen money that was personally attributed to Marcos.
Needless to say, after the revolution, no ten billion were found with him and his heirs. Not that Marcos was an angel, did not repress anyone and did not plunder anything (disputes on this topic are still going on), but the bubble of “corruption fighters” turned out to be ugly inflated and designed for very simple minds.
By the way, the current winner of the election cannot enter the United States, because he and his family are still suing there regarding the legality of the confiscation of their assets. This appears to be the second time in recent history that a nation elects a leader under US sanctions. The first case is Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who, however, despite the sanctions, has already been to the United States in his current capacity, causing great enthusiasm among the Indian community in this country.
Let us return to the question of the ideology of color revolutions: it was designed for third world societies and suffered from primitiveness, if not idiocy. But she worked for a long time. Only today one has to be a completely beaten nation in order to buy into this junk. In any case, there is historical justice in the fact that it was the Filipino people who subjected this ideology to mass execution.

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