Betrayed and died: Why the West can’t curb the migration crisis

Betrayed and died: Why the West can’t curb the migration crisis

Elena Karaeva

By accusing anyone but themselves, Eu-ropean politicians devalue any slogans about humanism by their actions.
In France, this night, forensic experts identified the first victim – Mariam Nuri Hamadamine: a 27-year-old woman drowned along with her fellow misfortunes a week ago when an inflatable boat on which illegal immigrants tried to cross the English Channel capsized.
The last thing Mariam wanted to do was become illegal. Her fiancé, a Kurd from northern Iraq, lived in Britain.
The couple intended to start a family, all attempts to obtain a visa to the United Kingdom for a young woman ended in vain. Then she, using social networks (and it is there that traffickers find their victims) and having paid almost fifteen thousand dollars, hit the road. She managed to get to Italy, from there to Germany, and eventually reach the French Calais.
Mariam walked along the so-called western route, “eastern”, which lies through the Balkans, longer, but cheaper.
When Paris and London shift the responsibility onto each other – “excuse me, you do not keep the borders of the English Channel locked”, “no, you only promise us money to strengthen the coast guard, but things are still there” – by bets in the game become life.
Not one, not two, not three, and not even a dozen – thousands of people are trying to find themselves in the EU, and then in Britain, since their own countries were turned into a bloody mess by the same EU and the same Britain. After that, the Europeans, both insular and continental, from the highest tribunes promised that they would accept those “who need asylum” and that they, the Europeans, “will cope with such a challenge.”
As a result of this irresponsible demagogy, millions of illegal immigrants who poured into Europe did not manage to get what, in fact, they wanted and what they were striving for: no one expected them, not in the sense of the lack of a roof over their heads or the opportunity to buy food, or send their children if they were to school.
Nobody expected them because the entire system of admitting foreigners to the EU and Britain turned out to be absolutely unsuitable for working with these people.
There was and still does not exist (although six years have passed) a system of teaching the language of the host country (and this is the first condition for starting a job search), and there is no vocational training specially adapted to the needs of migrants. Therefore, illegal immigrants have little choice – to live on a very modest benefit in very modest housing, and this is at best, or to join those who are involved in theft and drug trafficking. Actually, this is the life perspective that the European “Eldorado” gives illegal immigrants. Exceptions to the rule only confirm the rule.
The migration crisis was not created by illegal immigrants themselves, but by those who attracted them with stories about “European ideals” (even if it was only about order in the street and satiety for children), about humanism and “that human life is the most important value.” We have never seen the leaders of countries receiving migrants, if and when they accumulated at the border. The only one who came to talk to the illegal immigrants in his country was the Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko.
Paris on the same day promised that drones would fly over the beaches of Calais to signal the coast guard about attempts to sail to Britain.
There cannot be a clearer illustration of two different approaches to solving the problems of people, whose death and suffering is a direct consequence of the betrayal of the slogans declared by the Europeans themselves.

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