“Does not peck, even if you crack. Oh, horror!”

“Does not peck, even if you crack. Oh, horror!”

Maxim Sokolov

S. V. Lavrov spoke diplomatically (that is, translated into or-dinary language – rather sharply) about NATO Secretary General Stolt-enberg: “You know, I ha-ve not considered his stat-ements for a long time. In my opinion, he has lost touch with reality.”
Almost a century and a half ago, Prince Bismarck spoke (or is attributed to him) along approximately the same line: “You never lie so much as after a hunt and before a war.”
Whether there will be a war or not, God alone knows, but the fact that the reputation of previously considered reliable sources became a victim of a war that has not yet happened is beyond doubt. They fell on the field of public abuse.
A vivid and convex example of a complete reputational collapse is the Bloomberg agency. Until relatively recently, it specialized in economic information, and its reports, by and large, could be trusted. But these days of faith are gone forever. Having changed its news profile – now it trades in military-diplomatic reports – the agency threw its cap behind the mill in the shortest possible time.
Having unveiled the plan for Russia ‘s invasion of U-kraine on November 22 last year, Bloomberg did not a-nswer the natural question: “More than two months have passed, why hasn’t the Kremlin intervened yet?” Instead, he published a new sensation: the announced blitzkrieg did not happen because President Xi begged V.V. Putin not to invade until China held the Winter Olympics. At the same time, it was not specified whether the delay would last until February 20 or until March 13, when the Paralympic Games also end. And both Beijing and Moscow categorically denied the deep Bloomberg insider about secret military-sports diplomacy.
Other equally well-info-rmed sources brought information to US President Biden, which he immediately shared with President Zelensky, according to w-hich the reason for the del-ay is not the Olympics or Xi Jinping, but the weather. The earth has not yet fro-zen, in such a mudslide all the carts will get bogged d-own in the mud, and as so-on as it freezes, a blitzkrieg will immediately break out, Kiev will be ruined.
British sources say that it is not a matter of dirt, but of preparing a coup. Power will change in Kiev, and instead of Zelensky, former deputy E. Muraev will sit on Bankovaya. Indeed, Bis-marck was absolutely right: one never lies so much.
Of course, in the old d-ays they also lied. In E-nglish, there was even an expression “red herring” (red herring), which used to be translated as “duck”, and now as “fake”. An extremely popular word these days. But earlier, nevertheless, t-here was a division of spr-ings into verdant, relatively solid, and yellow, nowhere yellower, along which shoals of red herring float.
Now everything is connected. To the pillars of the American press, which were once supposed to give glory and honor, President Trump, discarding equivocations, with worker-peasant bluntness, answered: “You are fake news!” The view, of course, is very barbaric, but true. Fake news has taken on a lot of power. They lie – how they breathe.
There is, however, a problem. If the Bloombergs and others like them have decided not to be shy anymore, this is their right, free will, and paradise for the drunk. There will be a few more bellingcats. Again, every bird feeds with its nose.
But such a powerful information weapon has a small drawback. It is, if not a one-time action, then about that – a maximum of two or three times. And then your red curls will become familiar, and they will simply start not beating you, of course, but contemptuously ignoring you. “Ah, Bloomberg, everything is clear. Whistle, whistle, it’s nice to hear.” Which ultimately reduces the value of the red herring supplier. Customers start paying meagerly or stop paying altogether.
And this is inevitable. The news consumer who rejects such unscrupulous providers may do so for reasons of patriotism or love of superiors, but may also be driven by the most pragmatic considerations.
Regardless of how he feels about Russia and Putin, he needs good news in order to somehow plan for the future. Children, family, work, apartment, business, etc. Fake news here can be useful only in the sense that, by their roughness, one can get an idea of the degree of mental and moral inadequacy of other partners. And, accordingly, what you can expect from them and how you can rely on them. For the rest, you have to rely on more reliable (or not so unreliable) sources, as well as on your own knowledge and ability to make logical judgments. And to a sardonic grin.
But not everything is so sad for the Bloombergs. If you look at the texts compiled by uncritically thinking individuals – and every first one of them is in opposition, the Cartesian principle “question everything” is completely alien to them – it is clear that the basis for their work are red herrings, perceived as the ultimate truth. On the basis of these herrings, disputes are conducted and systems are created. For gentlemen in Her Majesty’s service cannot lie – that would be inconsistent with anything.
The peculiarity of the moment we are experiencing right now is precisely the shift in the balance of perception of fake news and the concepts that are built on their basis, from previously gullible to skeptical and contemptuous. Which is extremely irritating to both the bright West and its home bright adherents. “Does not peck, even if you crack. Oh, horror!”

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