‘Performing genocide in Xinjiang’

‘Performing genocide in Xinjiang’

Dmitry Kosyrev

I wonder how much m-oney from Ukrainian and American taxpayers went into the cyber war against Russia – all this huge factory of fakes that diverge around the world and throughout our country too. It would be rare luck to see exact figures somewhere, but sometimes luck happens, as happened with China, which is now studying another sanctions bill against itself.
The bill may be familiar to some readers. Mentioned in our story about America ‘s decision to fight the panda as a too peaceful and cozy symbol of China and everything Chinese. The anti-panda paragraph was written into the document, briefly titled “America Competes.” It has already passed the House of Representatives of the US Congress and will be adopted in one form or another.
The intention of this legislative initiative is to deprive China of global leadership in high technologies, cutting off access to semiconductors and at the same time creating problems in any supply chains. It is clear that in Beijing they study the text of this document under a microscope – and find a lot of fun. First about the panda, and now about the fact that 500 million dollars are allocated for the US Agency for Global Media, as well as performers of other media programs, to encourage materials in third countries (that is, not in the USA and, of course, not in China ) criticizing Beijing’s foreign economic policy, especially its Belt and Road global infrastructure development project.
How it’s done is simple: The Beijing-based English-language edition of Global Times tells the story of how local journalists in Zimbabwe were promised a thousand dollars for every story that Chinese business in this part of Africa is unethical, harming local communities and harming someone and something. Moreover, the money was promised by a person connected with the American embassy. This story became known because newspapers, in general, do not like the so-called jeans – when their resource is used by local workers for side personal earnings. Those were driven from the local The Herald, and there was a lot of noise.
Actually, there is nothing fundamentally new here, except for the fact that some part of the huge “empire of lies” has just been exposed in the American bill. And there is nothing specifically Chinese either, everything is familiar to us and others. Every day they lie for money, like a Kyiv fake factory. The only news is that today no one hides such things.
But there is still one noteworthy point here, and it is contained in the title of this future law, more precisely, in the word “competes.” After all, half a billion in this case is given out not in general for nasty things about China, but for quite targeted nasty things that are related precisely to global competition.
If your product is good, you win the competition on your own, right? No, you can still try to win it with sanctions, if you lie a lot. And here is another exactly the same story – no longer about the United States, but about their associates from the European Union. There, in the bowels of the European Commission, they are also developing all sorts of bills on the topic “How to get around a competitor if you lose to him in a fair fight.”
Namely: the EU wants to impose heavy fines on those companies (any, but operating in Europe ), whose supply chains are open to goods produced with violations of human rights or environmental standards (introduced, of course, by the European Union ). This – no one hides – is directed against China in the first place, because it is “performing genocide in Xinjiang.”
Wait, what is genocide, they ask in China. There are two defining documents: the 1948 UN Convention and the 1998 Rome Statute of the International Court of Justice. And there we read that genocide is when an entire national, religious (and so on) group is taken and – simply by the fact of belonging to one – people are either killed or “deliberately create conditions for it, calculated for its physical destruction in whole or in part”, – in general, what Ukraine did in the Donbass. But with China, it doesn’t work out here, especially if you look at the statistics of birth rates, income growth and other things for the Uyghurs, who are about to become the most privileged group in China. Well, then forced labor in China will come in handy. The European Commission is also considering such a document (however, the question arises: if someone is too lazy to work, but you can’t just ask for benefits, then the work of such a person is also forced?).
And now the main thing: where will the facts about violations of human rights, environmental standards and the use of forced labor come from? So they will be put here by these same journalists who create for a thousand dollars. And in addition, they will be quoted by the same human rights activists. The circle is closed.
I wonder if it is possible to have business at all – even purely economic ones – with people who cannot lie without lying and are not even particularly hiding? And after all, if only they lied, but they also regularly try to say some nasty things on the topics of morality and principles with rules. And if this concerned only Russia, one could talk about the oddities of Russophobia. But no, it concerns anyone.
Instead of an afterword: I wonder if we have foreign agents in Russia who specialize specifically in the implementation of that very program precisely along the Chinese line – remember that the business of this country is unethical, harms local communities and harms someone and what – something, in general, “predatory”? But there is. Such formulations and such “experts on China” have been flashing for a long time. A thousand dollars on the road do not roll.
And further. On the topic of speeches with high morale, there is a quote from one remarkable person: “If your opponents have switched to personal insults, be sure – you won.” Who said it – Mahatma Gandhi, Winston Churchill ? You’ll Never Guess: Adriano Celentano. Well, or one of the screenwriters in his films.

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