Washington confused G7 with G20

Washington confused G7 with G20

Petr Akopov

The new world has already arrived – but not for the Am-erican leadership, which prefers to remain captive to the old world order. On the eve of Joe Biden’s departure to Europe, his national security adviser Jake Sullivan said that the US wants to exclude Russia from the G20, the club of the world’s largest economies.
“As for the G20 issue, I will simply say this: we believe that Russia can no longer, as usual, conduct business in international institutions and in the international community,” Sullivan said, adding that Washington is still studying the issue and the United States wanted to would consult with allies “before making any further statements”. The issue of Russia’s participation in the club will be considered at the EU and G7 summits, which will be held on Thursday in Brussels with the participation of Biden.
This news perfectly characterizes the full scale of the American administration’s disconnection fro-m reality – simply because no one can be excluded from the G20. The leaders of the 20 largest (in terms of GDP) countries of the world gather once a year to discuss various issues of the world economy – although political issues, of course, are also discussed, mainly on the sidelines and at bilateral meetings.
Yes, formally the G20 grew out of the G8 — that is, an association of leading Western countries with the participation of Russia, which after 2014 returned to the G7 format — but it has long outgrown it and has become an independent and main world club. The G20 summit meetings began in 2008, after the global financial crisis exposed the flawed nature of the global financial system built by the West and its detrimental effect on the global economy. The era of Western dominance, in fact, ended just then – and the Anglo-Saxons themselves were forced to call for joint action to save the world economy, the key countries of the world. The G20 unites West and East, North and South – giving them the opportunity not only to seek common solutions.
Moreover, the second possibility has become much more important than the first, because the failure of the Anglo-Saxon model of globalization (of which the financial system is a part) has become more and more obvious every year. So world leaders had at least the opportunity to get together once a year – until the coronavirus deprived them of that too.
The last time the G20 met was in June 2019 in O-saka, Japan. The next two summits were held in video format, that is, they were just a formality. But at the end of October this year, th-e G20 will meet in Bali, ph-ysically, not virtually. In it-self, this summit will be the most important meeting of the year – because there we-re no meetings for three ye-ars, and the world has cha-nged more than seriously.
By the way, the Indones-ian island has already hosted a major international summit – the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (A-PEC), which unites, among others, China, Russia and the United States. Then, in 2013, the summit was held on October 7 – and in the morning, Vladimir Putin was also congratulated on his birthday by Xi Jinping, who only recently became the chairman of the PRC (and in the evening they even sat together over a bottle of vodka, as it turned out later).
And just a month before that, Putin himself hosted guests – the G20 summit in St. Petersburg. Both Xi and Obama were there, but even then Russia had cros-sed the Rubicon in relations with the United States. There has not yet been a turn of Ukraine towards Russia (after Yanukovych’s refusal to sign an agreement on European integration), but there was already an agreement between Putin and Obama on the removal of Syrian chemical weapons, which prevented the almost announced US strike on Syria. The rejection of the strike cost the United States the remnants of its reputation in the Middle East (the Saudis were very indignant), and Washington did not forgive Putin for what he had done.
But even more important was the granting of asylum in Russia in the summer of 2013 to Edward Snowden, a fugitive NSA officer whose extradition was demanded by the American authorities. It was then that the point of no return was passed in relations between the United States and Russia – and all subsequent events, including the Maidan in Ukraine, were only a consequence of Washington’s reaction to Putin’s “outrageous behavior” in the summer of 2013.
The following year, the G20 met in Brisbane, Australia, and in November 2014 the United States tried to isolate Putin at that summit. It did not work out, although our president left the event a little earlier than planned.
The creation of the G20 in itself has become a symbol of the failure of the Atlantic project – and now, in 2022, the attempts of the West to manipulate it are completely ridiculous. Who will support the West in seeking to exclude Russia?
The G20 is divided into exactly two parts: the Western world and the non-Western. The West includes the USA, Great Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea and the European Union (he is also a member of the club). That is, this is the same “Big Seven” with Anglo-Saxon Australia and South Korea dependent on the Americans.
The other half of the G20 is China, Russia, Ind-ia, Muslim countries (Sa-udi Arabia, Turkey, Indon-esia), Latin American countries (Mexico, Argentina a-nd Brazil) and South Afri-ca. That is, the very non-Western part of humanity that has not joined the West’s attempts to punish Russia and “cut” our country out of the world economy. Because he understands perfectly well that Russia is acting as a leader in the reorganization of the world order, and if you do not help it in this, then to-morrow the West will try to deal with the rest of the su-pporters of changing the world order, with those w-ho are not satisfied with the hegemonic claims of the Atlanticists. None of the n-on-Western half of the G20 is going to follow the lead of the States and isolate Russia – on the contrary, they see how the West causes enormous damage to the entire global economy and knocks out the supporting beams from the building of the global financial system.
Moreover, everything is not so simple in the western camp itself. If the Anglo-Saxon countries are united in their impulse (more precisely, Canada and Austr-alia obediently follow the US and Great Britain), then there are big problems with the rest. Continental Europ-ean powers (Germany, Fra-nce and Italy) are already falling into a very large geopolitical dependence on the States – and will in every possible way oppose the attempts of the Anglo-Saxons to finally lower the iron curtain between Europe and Russia. And Japan and South Korea are not at all eager to allow themselves to be isolated from Russia – realizing that their dependence on the Americans is not eternal. Unlike the neighborhood with our country.
Why, then, the States, understanding all this, generally raise the topic of excluding Russia from the G20?
To raise morale, that is, to show that they will stop at nothing in an effort to punish Russia? To change the subject – realizing that the set of real sanctions against Russia is almost exhausted, want to focus on the incredible, but loudly discussed expulsion from the G20?
In fact, things are much worse: they really believe that they have a chance to “exclude” Russia. And this confirms that Washington has a poor understanding of what is happening in the world, thinking that it can influence what in reality it is no longer able to influence.
The G20 is only a prototype of a future multipolar world. It will be more complicated and with a greater role for regional integration associations (such as ASEAN), but it does not depend on the will and influence of the Atlanticists. Only in the world of their imagination can they “exclude” Russia – in the real world, each such attempt eventually hits their own positions, reducing their influence.
And raising doubts about the adequacy of both the Anglo-Saxons and their most active associates. Poland, for example, has already offered to replace Russia in the G20 – but this is as relevant to reality as Ukraine’s proposal to take Russia’s seat on the UN Security Council.
However, if the Anglo-Saxons want to continue to live in the virtual world, these are their problems. This is only to our advantage, because the more painful their collision with reality will be. A new reality – both in the world and in the United States itself.

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